Estimated Spending on Beremagene Geperpavec for Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa
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JAMA Dermatol. 2024 Jan 31. doi: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2023.5857. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 38294784; PMCID: PMC10831624.

Estimated Spending on Beremagene Geperpavec for Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

Authors: Adam J N Raymakers 1 2Aaron S Kesselheim 1 2Arash Mostaghimi 2 3William B Feldman 1 2 4

Affiliation:

  1. Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law, Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
  2. Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
  3. Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
  4. Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract:

Importance: New gene therapies can offer substantial benefits to patients, particularly those with rare diseases who have few therapeutic options. In May 2023, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first topical gene therapy, beremagene geperpavec (B-VEC), for treating both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). However, FDA approval was based on limited data in patients with autosomal dominant disease, even though they comprise approximately 50% of all DEB cases.

Objective: To estimate projected spending in the US on B-VEC therapy for treating autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant DEB.

Design, setting, and participants: This economic evaluation used data from the National Epidermolysis Bullosa Registry to estimate the current population of US patients with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive DEB, with the aim of estimating US spending on B-VEC therapy from an all-payers perspective during 1- and 3-year periods after FDA approval. A base-case cost of $300 000 per patient per year was assumed based on a report from the manufacturer (Krystal Biotech).

Exposure: Treatment with B-VEC.

Main outcomes and measures: Estimated overall spending on B-VEC in the first year and over a 3-year period after FDA approval. Several prespecified sensitivity analyses with different assumptions about the eligible patient population and the cost of therapy were performed, and lifetime total costs of treatment per patient were estimated.

Results: The estimated number of US patients with DEB who were eligible for treatment with B-VEC in the first year after FDA approval was 894. The estimated total expenditure for B-VEC therapy was $268 million (range, $179 million-$357 million). Over a 3-year period, estimated spending was $805 million (range, $537 million-$1.1 billion). Estimated lifetime total costs per patient were $15 million (range, $10 million-$20 million) per patient with autosomal recessive DEB and $17 million (range, $11 million-$22 million) for patients with autosomal dominant DEB.

Conclusions and relevance: Results of this economic evaluation suggest that the FDA’s broad indication for the use of B-VEC in treating both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant DEB will have significant implications for payers.

Download: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/article-abstract/2814373